Kitchen remodel using oscillating tool

Discuss whatever you want here--both QB and non-QB related. Anything from the DEF INT command to the meaning of life!

Moderators: Pete, Mods

User avatar
burger2227
Veteran
Posts: 2144
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:40 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Kitchen remodel using oscillating tool

Postby burger2227 » Fri Aug 12, 2016 3:16 pm

I found a cheap apartment in Pittsburgh that I can use, but I have to invest my own money fixing it up.

First thing I saw was the yellow gas line for the apartment above running up the kitchen wall:
Image
Nice place for a gas line I cannot shut off right behind my gas cook-top and oven!

Decided to cut out the wall and shove it inside, but had to find beams to hold sections I cut out:
Image
Found beams to cut out sections of plaster board to screw back in later.

I found I had enough clearance without having to cut any wall beams after removing 3 pieces
Image
I cut slots to top and bottom where it should not be exposed. Plan to cover open areas with
cleanable boards later. A cabinet and hood will cover the rest, with exhaust duct to top and left.

Next I needed room for a cabinet and range hood with light and exhaust duct so the duct box needed cut out:
I did not want to try to cut the heater duct box while the gas hose was exposed nearby!
Image
Now I have to try to make the heater duct level by the new duct vent. A wedge on left side perhaps?

Luckily I missed the two by fours in the box bottom and only had to cut through 2 vertical beams ouside:
Image
All cuts were made by a Rockwell Sonicrafter cordless oscillating cutting tool. A pry bar helped too...

The side of the blade can also be used for long plaster or drywall cuts saving the blade teeth.
Cutting with the blade side also prevents cutting wires or pipes inside of walls too!

Even with the blade teeth, it takes extra effort to cut through wires or pipes, a good thing...

I bought this cordless model 3 years ago for $60 to cut PC boards and am down to one 11.1 lithium battery:
Image
The new ones have a quick clamp to change blades faster. Batteries are now 20 volt.

The sanding attachment has lots of sand paper and works fast to sand down plaster too!

11.1 volt batteries are made up of 3 18650 lithium cells. May have a go at replacing them some day...
Please acknowledge and thank members who answer your questions!
QB64 is a FREE QBasic compiler for WIN, MAC(OSX) and LINUX : http://www.QB64.NET
Get my Q-Basics demonstrator: https://www.dropbox.com/s/fdmgp91d6h8ps ... s.zip?dl=0

User avatar
burger2227
Veteran
Posts: 2144
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:40 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Kitchen remodel using oscillating tool

Postby burger2227 » Sat Sep 10, 2016 10:50 am

Running out of batteries for my Sonicrafter!
Image
This is actually the one I replaced batteries in. Replaced all 3 but some packs may only need one replaced.

The batteries consist of 3 cylindrical 18650 tabbed lithium cells providing 11.1 volts.
Image
The end casing has the + and - slots with 4 bordering tabs used while charging.
The separate charger has a protection circuit that monitors each battery charge.

Thankfully large end cap with grips just pries off with a screwdriver on each side until it unsnaps:
Image
The cover slides off of the batteries after that so they can be replaced. A screwdriver in the minus slot got it started.

B- ---█████---BM1----█████---BM2----██████----B+

Found a place offering 4 tabbed 18650 batteries for $15 so I ordered them to see if I could fix one battery pack:
Image
The tabbed lithiums came in nice clear hinged boxes with latches I could use to make battery packs...

Side shows top negative tab to the board (+ tab cutoff) and wires to monitor BM1 and plus connections:
Image
The red wire connects to the B+ 11.1 volt positive position, pink to the 3.7 volt BM1 position.

B- ---█████---BM1----█████---BM2----██████----B+

Negative battery tab end is soldered to the board HERE ↓↓↓↓↓ in a slot up top between 2 monitor tabs:
Image
The 7.4 volt BM2 position is monitored with the blue (black?) wire coming out of the square hole in front.

I decided to replace the short blue wire to the old battery tabs. The red and pink were just extended to tabs.
NOTE: Soldering two battery ends next to each other could create a problem with the positive battery by melting
the jacket. The surrounding jacket on the positive end of some replacement batteries is NEGATIVE and melting through the jacket while soldering will SHORT IT!

Solder wires to the positive end tabs away from the jacket, then fold it down when cold. Try to keep wires away
from battery ends. The large end gripper cap will be harder to SNAP back on If wires are back there!
Please acknowledge and thank members who answer your questions!
QB64 is a FREE QBasic compiler for WIN, MAC(OSX) and LINUX : http://www.QB64.NET
Get my Q-Basics demonstrator: https://www.dropbox.com/s/fdmgp91d6h8ps ... s.zip?dl=0

User avatar
burger2227
Veteran
Posts: 2144
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:40 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Kitchen remodel using oscillating tool

Postby burger2227 » Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:03 pm

One man kitchen cabinet replacement

Removing the cabinets was simple using 2X4 beams underneath the old ones and a beam with holding tabs on top:
Image

The top beam has pieces of wood screwed in the center to swing down to retain the cabinets while unbolting:
Image
After the cabinet is loose each stick can be turned to set each unit down one at a time.
The clips are centered so that the new cabinets can be adjusted sideways when aligning them all at once too.

A cabinet box was used to place the new ones close nearby for mounting. Last was the oven hood cabinet:
Image
I also had to close off the heater duct bottom with drywall available in 2 X 2 foot sections at Home Depot.

Here are the cabinets with the range hood on.
Image
Please acknowledge and thank members who answer your questions!
QB64 is a FREE QBasic compiler for WIN, MAC(OSX) and LINUX : http://www.QB64.NET
Get my Q-Basics demonstrator: https://www.dropbox.com/s/fdmgp91d6h8ps ... s.zip?dl=0

User avatar
burger2227
Veteran
Posts: 2144
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:40 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Kitchen remodel using oscillating tool

Postby burger2227 » Mon Jan 02, 2017 3:21 pm

Adding a furnace filter to a utility room door.

My utility room needed a door for a 79" by 29-1/2" opening that would help eliminate furnace noise and
still allow cold air to return through a standard 20" X 20" washable air filter. I found a 80" by 30" door
for less than $30 but it only uses a 1 inch by 1-1/8 frame so trimming the size would weaken the frame:
Image
I also was able to find 1-1/8" by 3-1/2" boards also known as 5/4 inch boards that could be used to re-frame
the door and surround the filter opening to hold the filter. Also I had to make the hinge areas stronger
after trimming 1/2" from the right side leaving just 1/2". Trimming the door knob side was not possible!

I cut the bottom frame off completely to get the height down to 79". This also allowed access to the hole:
Image
Then I used a piece of 5/4 to hammer out the cardboard stiffeners inside the door to clear the hole area.
Image
Then I cut pieces of 5/4 to rebuild the lower frame and frame the filter opening to hold the filter.
3" wood screws and wood glue hold the new 5/4 pieces to the frame and 1" screws to the door panels.

The vent grille hides the 1" screws on the front panel around the opening. Then I tested it:
Image
The furnace has plenty of air with the door blocking the doorway. Next I will need to cut out the top
hinge frame and insert new wood from the top using the oscillating tool to cut the opening.
Please acknowledge and thank members who answer your questions!
QB64 is a FREE QBasic compiler for WIN, MAC(OSX) and LINUX : http://www.QB64.NET
Get my Q-Basics demonstrator: https://www.dropbox.com/s/fdmgp91d6h8ps ... s.zip?dl=0

User avatar
burger2227
Veteran
Posts: 2144
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:40 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Kitchen remodel using oscillating tool

Postby burger2227 » Fri Mar 03, 2017 12:20 pm

I cut a piece 5/4" out of the top crossbeam to allow me to shim the vertical side beam for the top hinge:
Image
I used the oscillating tool to cut it out on all 4 sides. The narrow blade also removed left over portions
as it was glued pretty well to the thin front and back panels.

Next a wedge was created from a left over 5/4 X 3 beam used earlier. Cut to 2-1/4 wide to use a 3" screw later:
Image
The angle was cut to slide against a stiffener brace inside the door so that it would push the new beam toward the
Image
hinge beam that was cut in half when trimmed to fit the existing opening. Then it was hammered into place.

Glue was applied to the side of the beam so that it would slide in easier and hold it to the old beam.
Image
3" screws were driven into the side beam to pull the beam to the glued wedge which goes below top hinge area.

Now I plan to use the oscillating tool to sand down the hinge areas to inset them.
Please acknowledge and thank members who answer your questions!
QB64 is a FREE QBasic compiler for WIN, MAC(OSX) and LINUX : http://www.QB64.NET
Get my Q-Basics demonstrator: https://www.dropbox.com/s/fdmgp91d6h8ps ... s.zip?dl=0

User avatar
burger2227
Veteran
Posts: 2144
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:40 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Kitchen remodel using oscillating tool

Postby burger2227 » Sun Jun 11, 2017 8:28 am

Adding a ceiling medallion to cover up old plastering repairs around a lamp.

I stacked moving boxes (some empty, some full at bottom) to hold the weight of the lamp while disconnecting everything:
Image
The medallion only had a hole in the center and I did not want to cut it as the material was not easy to cut anyhow.
Cutting it would have left a noticeable slot also. The Tiffany style lamp was also pretty heavy to hold up.

I could not see myself holding it up while reconnecting everything including the wires...
Please acknowledge and thank members who answer your questions!
QB64 is a FREE QBasic compiler for WIN, MAC(OSX) and LINUX : http://www.QB64.NET
Get my Q-Basics demonstrator: https://www.dropbox.com/s/fdmgp91d6h8ps ... s.zip?dl=0


Return to “General Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests